Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) Immigration Programs-Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR IMMIGRATION PROGRAMS – FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

Immigration is a key component of the economic and labour market growth in Newfoundland and Labrador. As part of “The Way Forward on Immigration in Newfoundland and Labrador” our focus is to help provide newcomers with accurate information about the immigration process and programs offered by the province.

In addition to the monthly Applicant to NL information webinars offered by the Office of Immigration and Multiculturalism, we have created a frequently asked questions document to help guide you through the immigration programs offered by the province.

Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) Immigration Programs-Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

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  1. Do I need a job?

Yes. To be eligible for the Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial Nominee Program (NLPNP) and the Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP) you must have a full-time offer of employment from a Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) employer. Full-time means you would be working a minimum of 30 hours per week.

NLPNP AIP
·        NLPNP Job Offers:

Under NLPNP the job or job offer should be for at least two years with the possibility of extension, from an eligible Newfoundland and Labrador employer. Pay should be in the form of a salary and benefits package that meets provincial employment standards and prevailing wage rates. Contractual or locum positions (short-term positions usually less than twelve (12) months in duration with little or no possibility of extension) are not eligible for the NLPNP. Please review the category you are applying for eligibility requirements under NLPNP

NLPNP Express Entry

NLPNP Skilled Worker

International Graduate

 

·        AIP Job Offers:

Under AIP the job or job offer must be a full-time non-seasonal genuine offer of employment to employees brought in to Atlantic Canada through this program. To be eligible for the Pilot, the wages offered must fall within the range of wages for that particular occupation within the specified region in Newfoundland and Labrador, as identified by the federal government. Please review the category you are applying for eligibility requirements under AIP.

o   Atlantic Immigration Program Intermediate Skilled

o   Atlantic Immigration Program High Skilled

o   Atlantic Immigration International Graduate

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  1. How do I find a job?

There are a number of resources available to help connect you with employers currently experiencing vacancies in the province:

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  1. What jobs are in demand?

You can have a job offer in any field. Employers must first demonstrate that the position could not be filled by a Permanent Resident or a Canadian Citizen. Some priority and in-demand sectors in the province include:

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  1. How do I find a Designated Employer?

Employers who wish to utilize the Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP) must be designated by the Office of Immigration and Multiculturalism (OIM) by meeting certain requirements, including a commitment to support the newcomer and their family as they integrate into their new life in Atlantic Canada. Upon designation, employers can then forward applications from international workers to OIM to be endorsed, entitling the international worker to apply for a work permit and/or permanent residency. You can find Newfoundland and Labrador’s current list of Designated Employers at the following link: https://www.gov.nl.ca/immigration/immigrating-to-newfoundland-and-labrador/atlantic-immigration-pilot-program/designated-employers/

 Please note: Not all Designated Employers may be actively recruiting workers. We recommend you visit the job posting sites (see above Question #2), to find jobs within your skill set, and apply directly to employers. If, you receive a job offer from a Newfoundland and Labrador employer ask if they are a Designated Employer with the Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP) and if they are not, direct them to contact our office.

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  1. I’ve applied for jobs on the Job Bank but employers are not responding to my resume.

Anyone can view the job postings on Job Bank. But to register to create a Profile on Job Bank you will need a Social Insurance Number (SIN) or Express Entry Profile number to be entered during the registration process. As a foreigner, you can only get a SIN if you have a valid work, study or visitor permit to Canada. In those cases, you would be given a temporary SIN.

We are aware that you must have a SIN or work permit to create a profile, however we do suggest you submit an application to these employers and include detailed information in your cover letter to state you qualify to apply.

Because our office does not match Newfoundland and Labrador Employers or Designated Employers with international workers seeking work, you should always include a Cover Letter outlining your experience and qualifications with job application to increase the possibility that your application would be considered by a Newfoundland and Labrador employer.

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  1. What is my NOC Code Skill Level? How do I find it?

Each occupation in Canada will fall under a 4-digit numerical code called a National Occupational Classification code. This code will outline the main duties and employment requirements of the position. You can find the NOC code that applies to your job by searching the position title here: http://noc.esdc.gc.ca/English/noc/welcome.aspx?ver=16

You must review the main duties and employment requirements to ensure the NOC code matches your day-to-day responsibilities and that you have the correct qualifications. Based on the skill level, occupations are also categorized into 1 of 5 codes. These include levels O, A, B, C & D. To find the skill level that applies to your NOC code, you should compare the 4 digit code to this chart: http://noc.esdc.gc.ca/English/NOC/Matrix2016.aspx?ver=16.

For example:

  • Software Developer falls under NOC 2174 and is skill level A;
  • Cook falls under NOC 6322 and is skill level B.

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  1. Do I need a Job Vacancy Assessment (JVA) or a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA)?

In some cases, employers may be required to undergo a labour market test (i.e. either a Job Vacancy Assessment or a Labour Market Impact Assessment) prior to hiring you.

  • Employers in Newfoundland and Labrador may hire international workers to address temporary or permanent workforce needs.
  • If employers are looking to hire international workers for a short period of time, they will undergo the Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) process of the Temporary Foreign Worker Program. Some international workers, including select francophone applicants, are exempted from the Labour Market Impact Assessment. (please see International Mobility Program).
  • If employers are looking to fill vacancies permanently or for a longer term, they can avail of the NL Provincial Nominee Program, which requires a Job Vacancy Assessment or apply for designation under the Atlantic Immigration Pilot Program which requires employers to conduct local efforts to hire permanent residents and Canadian citizens before they can seek endorsements for international workers abroad (if the worker is already working for the employer, this requirement does not apply).

International workers can apply for a work permit to work temporarily in Canada. Many have employer-specific work permits. This means that they can only work for the employer named on their work permit. In some cases, an employer may need to obtain a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) before a work permit can be issued. A positive LMIA will show that there is a need for an international worker to fill the job and that no Canadian worker or permanent resident is available.

Job Vacancy Assessment (JVA) Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA):
1.     A process completed through the Department of Advanced Education, Skills and Labour, that focuses on assisting employers who are experiencing local, individualized labour market challenges and looking to hire an international worker to fill their long-term workforce needs. Labour Market Development Officers (LMDOs) in employment centres throughout Newfoundland and Labrador can assist employers through the JVA process.

Once individual positions are identified, the OIM staff complete additional assessments, in consultation with the Workforce Development Secretariat in the Department of Advanced Education, Skills and Labour, to ensure the positions to be filled support local labour market needs.

 

2.     The LMIA process is fully led by the federal government, and is intended for employers seeking to hire international workers to address temporary labour and skills shortages. LMIAs are documents that an employer may need to obtain before hiring international workers.

A positive LMIA confirms that there is a need for an international worker to fill the position. It will also show that no Canadian worker is available to do the job. A positive LMIA is also called a confirmation letter.

 

Employers initially review the IRCC website to confirm whether they would need to obtain an LMIA, or whether their position would be LMIA-exempt (international graduates are not required to undergo JVA or LMIA requirements). Exemptions are granted for a number of reasons, including international agreements, intra-company transfers, and other reasons. A full list of LMIA exemptions is listed on the IRCC website at https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/corporate/publications-manuals/operational-bulletins-manuals/temporary-residents/foreign-workers/exemption-codes.html

If an employer receives a positive LMIA (confirmation letter); they can proceed to hire an international worker through the Temporary Foreign Worker Program. The employer should provide a copy of the confirmation letter to each temporary worker it wishes to hire, and advise them to apply for a work permit. LMIAs can be used to apply for transitions to permanent residency through Express Entry.

In other situations, the worker may be exempt from the LMIA requirement. If that is the case, you will still need to provide the job offer information directly to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC).  If you are currently outside Canada, for example, your employer will more than likely require one. To find out if your employer needs an LMIA, please ask your employer to contact our office.

Important Note: International Graduates to the NLPNP are not required to undergo a JVA or LMIA requirements. Please see International Graduate eligibility requirements on the NLPNP website.

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  1. What are the differences between the types of work permits?

There are two basic types of work permits: closed and open.

Closed work permit (Employer Specific) allow you to work for just one employer in Canada. For closed work permit holders, you can only work for that employer stated on your work permit.

Open work permits allow you to work for any employer in Canada. Examples of open work permits include the Post-Graduate Work Permit, the Open Spousal Work Permit, and the Working Holiday Visa.

An open work permit is a work permit that is not job-specific. Because it is not job-specific, you will not need the following when you apply for your work permit:

  • a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) from Employment and Social Development Canada; or
  • proof that an employer has submitted an offer of employment through the Employer Portal and paid the employer compliance fee.

You may be eligible for an open work permit if you:

  • are an international student who graduated from a designated learning institution and are eligible for the Post-Graduation Work Permit Program;
  • are a student who’s no longer able to meet the costs of your studies (destitute student);
  • applied for permanent residence in Canada;
  • are a dependent family memberof someone who applied for permanent residence:
  • are the spouse or common-law partner of a skilled worker or international student;
  • are the spouse or common-law partner of an applicant of the Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP);
  • are a refugee, refugee claimant, protected person or their family member;
  • are under an unenforceable removal order;
  • are a temporary resident permit holder; and
  • are a young worker participating in special programs.

In each of these situations, you must meet additional criteria to be eligible.

If your spouse or common-law partner is living in Canada with you and is applying as a member of the Spouse or Common-Law Partner in Canada class, they can also apply for an open work permit when they apply for permanent residence. They must include a completed https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/work-canada/permit/temporary/extend.html and the correct fee, explaining that they are applying for an open work permit.

If your spouse or common-law partner has already submitted an application for permanent residence but hasn’t applied for an open work permit, they can submit a completed IMM 5710 and the correct fee to this address:

Case Processing Centre in Edmonton
Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada
c/o Work permits for spouses or common-law partners, Station 777
9700 Jasper Avenue NW, Suite 55
Edmonton, AB T5J 4C3

For more instructions, please see the guide for Applying to Change Conditions or Extend Your Stay in Canada.

International Graduates: Spouses of international students enrolled at Memorial University of Newfoundland and Labrador, College of the North Atlantic or a provincially-recognized private training institution may be eligible to apply under the Skilled Worker category.

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  1. What happens if my work permit expires during or after NLPNP nomination/AIP endorsement?

If you have a current and valid application with the Office of Immigration and Multiculturalism under the Provincial Nominee or Atlantic Immigration Pilot and work permit expires you must cease working immediately. Contact our office immediately by email immigration@gov.nl.ca; or call 1.709.729.6607 and inform us of the situation.

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  1. My Spouse/Common Law Partner has an Open Work Permit. If they obtain a job offer, permanent employment, are they eligible to apply under Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial Nominee Program (NLPNP) or Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP) on our behalf?

Yes, if your spouse or common-law partner already has a valid work permit, depending on the program eligibility he or she may apply to either program.

Work permits submitted with the application must have duration of at least six (6) months remaining prior to expiry date. Applications submitted when there are fewer than six (6) months remaining on the work permit may be returned to the applicant.

NOTE: OIM do not accept two applications for family members at the same time, you must have only one active application for you or your spouse to either the Provincial Nominee Program or the Atlantic Immigration Program.

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  1. Do I need work experience to apply for NLPNP nomination/AIP endorsement?

Yes, for applicants under Express Entry, Skilled Workers or under the Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP) Intermediate Skill or High Skill, you must meet the employment requirements of the occupation in which you would like to work (or are currently working). OIM uses the National Occupational Classification (NOC) system to determine whether you meet these requirements. For more information, please consult the NOC database: http://noc.esdc.gc.ca/English/noc/welcome.aspx?ver=16.

NLPNP International Entrepreneur-The International Entrepreneur category is intended for experienced business owners or senior business managers who wish to permanently reside in Newfoundland and Labrador.  They must start a new business or buy an existing business and must actively participate in the day-to-day management of the business.  After operating the business for at least one continuous year, the international entrepreneur may be nominated for permanent resident status, subject to fulfillment of certain criteria outlined by the Office of Immigration and Multiculturalism. Work experience required under the NLPNP International Entrepreneur includes:

  • Having at least two (2) years’ experience actively managing and owning a business (25 percent minimum ownership) in the last five (5) years OR five (5) or more years’ experience in a senior business management role in the last ten years.

International Graduates: If you graduated from a Canadian Post-Secondary institution, you may not be required to have previous work experience. Please visit the NLPNP International Graduate page website of the NL Provincial Nominee Program to review the eligibility criteria.

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  1. Do I need English language testing?

English language testing (in each area of speaking, listening, reading and writing in English or French) is required depending on the program you are applying under and the skill level of the job offer. Language assessments will be required when applying to:

NLPNP AIP
a)      Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial Nominee Program (NLPNP):

·        Express Entry Category– All applicants (Minimum ranges from CLB 4.0- 7.0 in each area);

·        Skilled Worker Category– NOC skill level C and D job offers (Minimum CLB 4.0 in each area);

·        International Graduate– NOC skill level C job offers (Minimum CLB 4.0 in each area);

·        International Entrepreneur– (Minimum CLB 5.0 in each area);

·        International Graduate Entrepreneur– (Minimum CLB 7.0 in each area).

 

b)      Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP):

To immigrate through the Atlantic Immigration Pilot Program, you must prove your English or French language ability and submit with your endorsement application. You must take one of the language tests we approve. It will show you can communicate in English or French well enough to live and work in Canada. The test shows your abilities in writing, reading, listening and speaking. To measure your levels, we use the Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB) for English or the Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadien (NCLC) for French.

·        schedule your test and pay the fees;

·        have a language level of CLB 4 or higher;

·        have results that are less than 2 years old when you apply; and

·        include the results of your test when you apply.

Atlantic Intermediate Skilled Program

Atlantic High Skilled Program

Atlantic International Graduate Program

Please note that even if you are not required to do a language assessment at the time of application, both provincial and federal government may request it at a later date during the Permanent Residence application process.

International Graduates please note: Even though you were educated in Canada, you must take one of the approved language tests. The test shows you can communicate in English or French well enough to live and work in Canada. If you already took one of the approved tests, you can send those results if they:

  • are less than 2 years old; and
  • show you meet the language level the program requires.

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  1. Can I complete language testing outside Canada?

You can complete the language testing outside of Canada. The accepted tests are as follows.

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  1. How do I get an Educational Credential Assessment (ECA)?

An Educational Credential Assessment is a report by an independent company that evaluates your foreign education. This report is used to make sure that your foreign degree, diploma, certificate (or other proof of your credentials) is valid and equal to a Canadian one. You may consult Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada for more details: https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/immigrate-canada/express-entry/documents/education-assessed.html.

A credential assessment is advice on how qualifications from another country compare to Canadian qualifications. An assessment does not guarantee that:

  • a regulatory body will issue you a license to practice; and
  • your credentials will be accepted by a Canadian employer.

However, a credential assessment will help you understand the Canadian educational system and assist you with your job search. To have your credentials assessed by one of the provincial evaluation services, please consult the Foreign credentials referral office (PDF, 2.12MB).

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  1. Can I apply under the NLPNP International Graduate category if I graduated in another province/territory outside Newfoundland and Labrador?

Yes. You need to have completed at least half of your studies in Canada and have graduated from an eligible publicly funded Canadian college or university. You must submit proof of graduation from the Canadian post-secondary institution you attended with your application.

If you hold a Post-Graduate Work Permit, and you graduated from a university or college outside of Newfoundland and Labrador, but within Canada, you must be working in your field of study to qualify prior to applying.

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  1. I’m a Canadian Post-Secondary International Graduate. Do I need a job in my field of study for my NLPNP International Graduate application?

If you are a graduate of Memorial University of Newfoundland (MUN) or College of the North Atlantic in Newfoundland (CNA), you do not need to work in your field of study. Your employment must still normally require a post-secondary degree or diploma, and cannot be in a NOC D level position. You can see the full details of this policy here: https://www.gov.nl.ca/immigration/immigrating-to-newfoundland-and-labrador/provincial-nominee-program/applicants/international-graduate/.

Applicants to the NLPNP International Graduate category should hold either:

  • a full-time, indeterminate position related to their field of study, or
  • a position that is commensurate with their skills, experience and/or training.
  • Applicants are permitted to hold a position that is unrelated to their field of study, provided the applicant is a graduate of Memorial University or College of the North Atlantic and that the applicant’s position:
  • Requires a post-secondary degree or diploma;
  • Corresponds to National Occupational Classification (NOC) levels 0, A, B or C;
  • Can reasonably be expected to lead to career advancement for the applicant;
  • Is in a field in which the applicant has a recent (i.e. in the last 5 years) combination of skill, experience and/or training, according to the NOC description, as defined by Employment and Social Development Canada: http://noc.esdc.gc.ca/English/home.aspx;
  • Is full-time and indeterminate; and
  • Responds to a perceived labour market need in Newfoundland and Labrador.

The applicant’s employer must adhere to the requirements of the Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial Nominee Program (NLPNP), including being established and operating in Newfoundland and Labrador for at least two (2) years (unless exempt under NLPNP, such as businesses in rural areas), and adhering to all applicable labour laws and regulations in Newfoundland and Labrador. The employer may be asked to explain how the position responds to a perceived labour market need in their organization/business.

If you hold a Post-Graduate Work Permit, and you graduated from a university or college outside of Newfoundland and Labrador, but within Canada, you must be working in your field of study to qualify prior to applying.

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  1. What Settlement support Agencies are there with Language Training for Provincial Nominee Program (NLPNP) and Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP)?

When you become a Permanent Resident through the Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial Nominee Program (NLPNP) or Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP), you and your family members are then eligible to access language training through the Association of New Canadians (ANC) or the Federation Francophone de Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador (COMPAS).

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  1. How long does it take for applications to be processed?

Once a NLPNP file is complete (you submitted all documents required for your application) and assigned to an immigration officer, we will strive to have the application processed and a decision on the file made within approximately 25 business days. For more information, please visit the service standard for NLPNP applications on our website.

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  1. Can my family accompany me?

You can bring family members with you to Canada if they were included in your permanent residence application as your dependents. Your dependents can’t arrive in Canada before you. They must arrive with you or after you.

You may be able to sponsor them after you immigrate to Canada. Please refer to include family members’ eligibility on the IRCC website https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/immigrate-canada/family-sponsorship/spouse-partner-children/eligibility.html

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  1. Do I need to have a Police Clearance?

You and any family members, 18 years of age or older may need to get a police certificate, depending on the program for which you’re applying.

https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/application/medical-police/police-certificates/about.html#who

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  1. Who qualifies as a dependent, and do I need custody?

The age limit of dependent children is 22 years. Children qualify as dependants if they meet both of these requirements:

  • they’re under 22 years old, and
  • they don’t have a spouse or partner

https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/immigrate-canada/age-limit-requirements-dependent-children.html)

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  1. Do I need a consultant on my application?

You do not need to hire an immigration representative to help you with your immigration application. It is your decision. Your application will not be given special attention or guaranteed approval if you use a consultant or lawyer.  If you hire a representative, make sure you fill out the applicable use of a representative form that can be found on our website. https://www.gov.nl.ca/immigration/immigrating-to-newfoundland-and-labrador/provincial-nominee-program/applicants/using-representatives-and-consultants/

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  1. What community supports exist for me and my family in Newfoundland and Labrador?

A big part of settling into a new place is about meeting people. Information links below are here to help you integrate into the community and meet new people through volunteering activities, sports and recreation, multicultural events and activities and through religious organizations and church groups.

Settlement Supports within Newfoundland and Labrador include:

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) has produced a number of videos that are intended to help newcomers settle in Canada:

  1. Before You Arrive in Canadarecommends that newcomers bring all of their personal identification documents with them and have all their official documents translated into English or French before coming to Canada, among many other recommendations.
  2. Your First Two Weeks in Canadaexplains to newcomers the importance of obtaining a Social Insurance Number, contacting a local settlement organization, and finding employment.
  3. Language Training for Canadawill help newcomers learn about the steps they can take to improve language skills before and after arriving in Canada.
  4. Advancing Foreign Credential Recognition:The Government of Canada is committed to improving the process of foreign credential recognition to make it faster, fairer and more consistent across Canada. This will help new immigrants contribute to their full economic potential when they arrive in Canada.

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  1. I have a degree in a regulated occupation. How can I get my credentials recognized?

To apply for permanent residence through one of Canada’s economic immigration programs –Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial Nominee Program (NLPNP) or Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP), you may be required to have an Educational Credential Assessment performed by one of the organizations that have been designated by IRCC. These are not the only organizations performing this service; however they are the only bodies that are recognized to provide assessments for immigration purposes. You may find this assessment useful when determining how international education compares to Canadian standards.

If you are immigrating as a skilled worker, working in a certain profession or trade or studying you will be required to have your home country high school education and post-secondary education assessed. Foreign qualification recognition is the process of verifying that the knowledge, skills, work experience and education obtained in another country are comparable to the standards established for Canadian professionals and tradespeople. The Credentials you got outside Canada will need to be assessed, such as:

Regulatory or Licensing Credentials

Applicants with work experience in an occupation that is regulated in Newfoundland and Labrador, and requires mandatory certification or licensing are required to obtain proof of eligibility for provincial licensure to be able to work in that profession before applying to the Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP) or Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial Nominee Program (NLPNP).

If the applicant is to be employed as a trades-person in a compulsory trade, he or she must have a certificate of qualification in their skilled trade issued by the Department of Advanced Education, Skills and Labour.

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  1. What supports exist for me if I want to enroll in the credentials recognition processes?

  • In regulated occupations and skilled trades the relevant provincial or territorial regulatory body is the authoritative source of information on all aspects of foreign credential recognition for the regulated occupation.
  • Some sectors have voluntary certification systems that can be used to assess the abilities of International Trained Workers in non-regulated occupations.
  • Prior Learning Assessment Recognitionservices are available at many colleges and institutes. This is the identification and measurement of skills and knowledge acquired outside of formal educational institutions. Prior Learning Assessment Recognition can establish competency equivalencies for skills and knowledge gained outside of Canada and can determine eligibility to practice a trade or profession.

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  1. Notification of the IRCC Decision for my endorsement/nomination Permanent Residence (PR) Application.

Important Note: An Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP) endorsement or Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial Nominee Program (NLPNP) nomination does not guarantee that a Permanent Resident (PR) visa will be issued. Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) makes the final decision for the granting of permanent resident visas after ensuring that all legislative requirements are met, including medical, criminality and security checks.

The Department may withdraw your nomination at any time prior to the issuance of the permanent resident visa and prior to landing in Canada if:

  • The applicant no longer meet minimum eligibility requirements of the Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP) or Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial Nominee Program (NLPNP) such as changes in your employment;
  • The Department is advised by the Canadian visa office that any information provided in your application for permanent residency is false or fraudulent; or
  • Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) finds that you or a dependent is inadmissible as a result of medical, criminality, security checks or invalid passport.

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  1. I received approval for my NLPNP Nomination/AIP Endorsement and have applied for Permanent Residence, but I have lost my job, what do I do?

If you lose or quit your job during the nomination process; you will need to inform the immigration officer assigned to your file of any changes in employers or your employment situation. 

Immediately contact our office via email immigration@gov.nl.ca, telephone 1.709.729.6607 or directly speak to the Immigration Officer assigned to your file. 

Your nomination and Permanent Residency application may be cancelled if there are changes to your employment status before you receive your Permanent Residence approval from IRCC.

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  1. Tips for hiring a Consultant.

Immigration consultants, lawyers, and other representatives give immigration advice and help immigration applicants, usually for a fee. You do not need to hire an immigration representative to help you with your immigration application. You do not need to hire an immigration representative to apply for immigration or for Canadian citizenship with Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC). It is your decision. Your application will not be given special attention or guaranteed approval if you use a consultant or lawyer.

  • Immigration representatives do not have special connections with Newfoundland and Labrador or Canadian government officials and cannot guarantee your application will be successful;
  • Only authorized officers with the OIM and IRCC (including Canadian embassies, high commissions and consulates) can make decisions on your application;
  • Only the following people may charge a fee to represent or advise you on immigration matters with the Governments of Newfoundland and Labrador and Canada:
  • Lawyers who are members in good standing of a Canadian provincial or territorial law society;
  • Immigration consultants who are members in good standing of the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council (ICCRC); and
  • Notaries who are members in good standing of the Chambre des notaires du Québec.
  • Before you pay anyone a fee, check their credentials to make sure they are members of one of the organizations above and go to their respective websites for further information on their standing and/or registration;
  • Never follow advice to use false documents or making false statements on your immigration application forms. This is illegal and will result in the refusal of your application;
  • Beware of internet scams and false websites. Some websites may appear to be official government websites, but the information they contain may be inaccurate or out of date. The official Immigrate to Newfoundland and Labrador website operated by the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador is gov.nl.ca/immigration. The official website of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) is https://www.canada.ca/en/services/immigration-citizenship.html;
  • All the application forms to apply to the Newfoundland and Labrador Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP) are available for free. Applications for the Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial Nominee Program (NLPNP) Express Entry/Skilled Workers have a $250 CAD fee payable to the Newfoundland and Labrador Exchequer;
  • Processing fees for Canadian immigration are the same at all Canadian visa offices around the world. Fees in local currency are based on official exchange rates and correspond with the amount in Canadian dollars.
  • Canadian visa offices will never ask you to deposit money into an individual’s personal bank accounts or to transfer money through a specific private money transfer company;
  • To read more, including information on who can legally represent you if you choose to hire an immigration representative, visit IRCC’s web pages on Immigration Representatives;
  • Top Tips – How to recognize unauthorized representatives, visit Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council (ICCRC) website: https://iccrc-crcic.ca/fraud-prevention/; and
  • If you have questions, please contact the Office of Immigration and Multiculturalism immigration@gov.nl.ca.

If you think your immigration representative has treated you unfairly or broken the law while representing you, the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) website has information on how to file a complaint. 

Important Note:  If you decide to hire a representative but do not declare this on your application forms, this is considered to be false and misleading information and will result in your Provincial Nominee Program (NLPNP) or Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP) application being declined.